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  • Writer's pictureDaniel Wakefield

The Power of Genuine Human Connection


What's the #1 thing I hear people tell me when I talk to them about headshots?


"I don't feel comfortable in front of the camera."


It's why so many of us hate things like school picture day, headshots, etc. We know we need to get them done. But we're also afraid we won't be able to look like the picture of confidence and personality that we really are.


You know what else people tell me?


"I usually like myself better in candid photos."


Why is that? I think it's simple. In candid photos, we don't know the camera is there. So there's no pressure to perform. We just look like we're smiling and interacting with other people. It opens the door for looking more genuine.


So how can you get that same kind of look (super important professionally) in a headshot when you are LITERALLY staring down the barrel of a camera lens? Especially when a great first impression for your business is on the line?


Answer: Genuine. Human. Connection.


That's the basis for everything I do.


Listen, there's no denying the uncomfortability of standing in front of a camera. I've felt it myself.


It's also why I consider myself a coach just as much as a photographer. Getting great expressions out of people is just as important, if not more important, than getting great lighting, etc. (though it helps if both are present!)


How do I do this?


The goal is not to force someone into an expression. Ultimately, my goal is to make someone forget they're in front of a camera because they're so focused on the interaction that WE are having as two human beings.


You know what that does? It makes it look like you're smiling at a person, not a camera. Because you really are.


Here's what this does to your headshot. When people see it on LinkedIn or wherever you post it, it now looks like you're smiling at THEM. It's a simple but powerful way to foster connection before you even meet someone.


And thankfully, if you're in front of my camera, it helps people forget about how uncomfortable they were in the first place.







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